News

Below are press releases from the National Institute of Statistical Sciences.

NISS Hires Lawrence H. Cox as Assistant Director for Official Statistics

Lawrence H. Cox, Ph.D. has been appointed Assistant Director for Official Statistics at the National Institute of Statistical Sciences (NISS).  The announcement was made by Alan Karr, Director of NISS, who noted that “Larry Cox is a distinguished statistician who will help NISS in many ways, especially on research conducted in partnership with the federal statistical agencies. Larry’s joining us is an important step in the evolution of NISS.

National Institute of Statistical Sciences Awarded Grant for Postdoctoral Research in Support of Science Resource Statistics (SRS)

The National Institute of Statistical Sciences (NISS), an independent institute that conducts cross-disciplinary and cross-sector statistical sciences research, has been awarded a $750,209 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to establish a postdoctoral research program in collaboration with NSF’s Division of Science Resource Statistics (SRS). The two-year program will begin this June.

NISS and SAMSI Win NCPRSA 2010 InSpire Award in Social Media Category

The National Institute of Statistical Sciences (NISS) has been awarded the North Carolina Public Relations Society of America (NCPRSA) InSpire Bronze Best of Category Award for the Social Media category. The award was presented on Wednesday, May 5 at the Brier Creek Country Club. Bill Leslie, anchor for WRAL News, was the emcee.

All Things Considered - Seeking Answers in a Maze of Health Studies

NPR interviewed Stan Young, assistant director of bioinformatics at NISS. Young speaks with host Guy Raz about searching for verifiable health patterns in a world of limitless data. This story aired on Saturday, March 13, 2010. Click here to listen to the interview.

Ars Technica: We're So Good at Medical Studies that Most of them are Wrong

Stan Young, Assistant Director, Bioinformatics at NISS, was part of a panel that spoke at the AAAS conference in San Diego in February 2010. This article describes that most times, epidemiology studies have problems with statistics. The author of this article  from Ars Technica believes that the statistical tools for evaluating the science hasn't kept up pace with the scientific output. Click here to read the article.